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PADI Dive courses and trips

Underwater Adventures is a dive club and school with meetings throughout Hertfordshire and Bedfordshire. We have meetings at the Orange Tree pub in Hitchin, the White Horse Pub in Bedford, and the Red Bull pub in Cambridge, plus pool session at the Robinson pool in Bedford and the Bourn golf club just outside Cambridge. Offering PADI scuba diving courses for all levels from beginner to instructor, UK dive trips all year round plus many foreign dive trips. We offer full equipment servicing and compressed air or nitrox fills delivered right to your door as well as equipment rental and servicing plus discounts.
Contact us for more info
Scuba diving training Bedfordshire

WHAT OUR CUSTOMERS SAY

Humongous thanks to the most tolerant and supportive instructor I could ever have wished for! Today's dive in the Lake was awesome and I loved every minute! Next dive - Hikkaduwa in Sri Lanka in 3 weeks!!!
Underwater Adventures have blessed me with a whole new world. Please ensure you contact them for all your scuba inquiries! Stephen is an exceptional instructor and the other divemasters involved really have been outstanding throughout my 6 months of training and preparation... it has been a long road but I am over the moon. I am now a PADI open water scuba diver and immensely proud of myself!

Aiden Lunnon, Hertfordshire 5 out of 5 stars
PADI Scuba diving training Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire and Cambridge

LATEST EVENTS

08thApril
Swanage Scuba Diving Trip - 01/04/18


The first dive club trip of the season to Swanage took place on the 1st April. Five of us (Steve Groves, Jamie, Josh, Stephan and myself) began a 3-hour journey down to the south coast at the crack of dawn. Anticipating a busy day and previous experience queueing at the pier we were surprised to find we were the only ones. We had a bit of time to kill before we could gain access to the pier and get ready so it was a good chance for a chat a quick dive briefing and orientation of the days diving. Being April the air temperature was only 7 Degrees. We all anticipated a cold days scuba diving. Our main focus would be to keep ourselves as warm as possible, as only one of the group was in a drysuit.


                                                


Eventually, someone finally arrived to let us onto the pier. Time to get ready for our first scuba dive ‘Fleur de Lys’. We got our gear together, tanks filled and boarded the dive boat looking forward to a cold but good days scuba diving. The ‘Fleur de Lys’ was only a short dive boat ride, we kitted up ready to go. We buddied up and got into the water in pairs, straight down the shot line to the wreck. At first, the temperature of the water doesn’t seem to have an effect but with a bottom temperature of 7 degrees and scuba diving in a 5mm wetsuit you soon start to feel it.


                   


This wasn’t too much a concern though for now and we descended to 10metres. At the wreck, the visibility was not great at <1m. Luckily we’d packed our torches which would assist us navigating the wreck. Even with torches, we had to stay close our buddies as the visibility was that bad and paired with a swirling undercurrent we were blown about quite a bit. We had to take control of our buoyancy and close contact at all times. After about 15mins in the water Jamie signaled to me he was cold I was the same. We agreed to continue the dive for a little while. Battling the current, cold and poor visibility we decided to end the scuba dive after 23mins. With the conditions, it was very easy to lose each other which is what happened. As Jamie was preparing to deploy his DSMB we were separated. So the thing for us to do would be to look for one minute then meet on the surface. That’s what we did, a slow ascent with a 3-minute safety stop. As happens I surfaced first a fair distance from the boat, no problem I just signaled to the boat and they picked me up. Getting out the water was easy as the boat is fitted with a lift. Once on the boat, it was time to warm up. After a minute I saw Jamie’s DSMB and he surfaced and boarded the boat. Followed closely by the other 3 scuba divers. We were all offered a selection of hot drinks to warm up and discussed the events of the dive we’d just done. Based on everyone’s responses it was clear we were all very cold. During the short trip back to shore Jamie decided that he did not want to do the second dive. This was quickly followed by the rest of us unanimously agreeing that was the sensible option based on the facts. We arrived at the pier quickly and it was time to get dry and warm as quickly as possible. We paid the captain and decided what we were going to do next. Once we were dressed some of the group decided to go get some food before the long journey home, while others got a head start on the journey home.


Written by
Phil 
Denmen
31stMarch
What is the PADI rescue diver course?

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I’ve been asked a number of times over the past couple of month about the PADI rescue diver course, what’s it about, what will I learn, why should I take this course. So, I thought I’d write a little blog about the PADI rescue diver course to try and answer some of these questions.
The PADI rescue diver course is said by most who take it to be the most challenging but also the most enjoyable of the PADI core courses. It will push you to think about and how best to deal with problems before they happen and how best to avoid them in the first place. Through a number of scenarios which will take place over a weekend, you will be asked to deal with situations that you might come across on any day while scuba diving, from a missing diver to something as simple as a diver going into the water having forgotten something they need to complete their scuba dive like a weight belt or forgetting to turn their air on fully. Simple things but you will learn that even a simple thing can cause problems later on in a dive.



     


 
But the PADI rescue divers course is more than just scenario practice. You will start the course with the PADI Rescue diver online theory, the codes for this will be sent to you as soon as you sign up for the course, so you can get started straight away. The PADI rescue dive online theory will take you through how to recognize problems before they happen, the stressors you might be able to see in a person before they dive which might lead to that scuba diver having problems on the dive, you’ll be surprised at how little changes in how a person is acting can show you that this person is not comfortable and a little stressed and even a little bit of stress can lead to perceptual narrowing causing a scuba diver to focus one little thing thus allowing a scuba diver to miss other things that might be going wrong.
You will learn that it is OK to say that you don’t want to dive. Be it at this location, in this weather or because you’re just not feeling right today.
On top of the phycology of scuba diving, the PADI rescue diver theory will take you through the most common problems people will come across with their scuba diving equipment which can lead to problems on a dive and it will talk about how important it can be to have something as simple as a spares box, how having access to a new fin strap or a cable tie can solve a problem that is stressing a diver out and by solving this problem for them now will save possible extra problems later in a dive.


                                          


 
Also, during the PADI rescue diver online theory you will be guided through how best to deal with problems once they have happened in a safe and calm manner. Like how to deal with someone who is panicking both on the surface and underwater. This part of the course we will also go over in the Deep swimming pool at the Robinson Swimming pool in Bedford which is deep enough to actually practice the safety skills before we go into open water, and this is where the fun begins. You, along with the rest of the students on your course will get to practice the basic safety skills using fun games designed to help you learn. By using games and making it fun, we use the latest teaching theory on how to reinforce skill learning in a way that is easy for your mind to recall when it needs to allow you to act faster and better in a situation.
The basic skills we go over in the pool will be gone over again when we go to open water to help refresh your mind and again reinforce these actions in your mind.

 
                                        


Once at the open water site, you will be put in change as safety divers for the weekend. You will be asked to do a risk assessment of the site so that you and your fellow students start to think clearly about what might go wrong. You will be shown how to use our emergency O2 kit which is always stowed in the van in case of a diving emergency, you will be asked to complete an emergency assistance plan so that you know what you will do in 
an emergency, and you will be asked to keep an eye on everyone just in case something “Goes Wrong”. The dive team have a list of scenarios we can use to test your response. The important thing is to act and to do so with a clear mind. The scenarios could be anything, from a missing diver to someone having a heart attack (which is actually the most common reason behind deaths in scuba diving in this country) and how you deal with these scenarios will be assessed by the dive team so that at the end of the weekends we will all sit down for a chat about what we did. This allows you to think about everything that has happened and how you have dealt with it and most importantly, what you might do differently to make it easier should you ever be in a similar situation again. It’s this reflection at the end of the weekend which helps you reinforce everything you have learned and makes you the best PADI rescue diver you can be.
 
So if you would like to take your scuba diving to the next level and become a PADI rescue diver, give us a call on 07805045867 or drop us an email by clicking here.

 
28thMarch
What is the PADI advanced open water course?



I keep getting asked what is the PADI advanced open water course and why should people take it? Basically, the PADI advanced open water course is the next step to take once you have learned to scuba dive with the PADI open water course. It allows you to gain more experience and confidence under the supervision of a PADI professional to help you move your scuba diving skills forward. The course is made up of the first dive of any 5 specialty courses so that you get to experience different types of scuba dive which will hopefully help you find areas that you are interested in, from fish identification, though underwater photography to wreck diving, there are so many different things you can do with you scuba diving and the PADI advanced course will help you find the things you really enjoy.



       


During the scuba course, you will complete 5 dives, a deep dive, a navigation dive, and 3 of your own choice from any of the specialty courses we offer. We would normally suggest including the wreck diver course as wrecks hold a lot of interest for most scuba divers and the PADI DSMB course where you will learn to send up a large inflatable maker buoy so that everyone can see where you are, which when scuba diving in a big ocean is probably a really good thing, but the choice is yours.


        


The two required scuba dives, the deep dive, and the navigation dive, are on the course so that you can experience deeper diving then you can with the PADI open water course while your instructor can take you through some of the safety aspects of scuba diving deeper and its effect on you and your scuba diving equipment, and with the navigation dive you will work on your natural navigation and how to use the compass to navigate something other than the straight line you did on your PADI open water course. All the time building your confidence and improving your scuba diving skills.


        


We run these PADI advanced open water courses most qualifying weekends at Gildenburgh water in Cambridgeshire and we also run 
special advanced weekends at the coast so that we can add dives such as PADI boat diver and the PADI drift diver course and we have one of these weekends coming up at the beginning of May, where we will be heading down to Swanage in Dorset for a weekend of scuba diving. So if you would like more details of this PADI advanced open water course or any of our PADI courses, please feel free to contact us anytime by clicking here.