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PADI Dive courses and trips

Underwater Adventures is a dive club and school with meetings throughout Hertfordshire and Bedfordshire. We have meetings at the Orange Tree pub in Hitchin, the White Horse Pub in Bedford, and the Red Bull pub in Cambridge, plus pool session at the Robinson pool in Bedford and the Bourn golf club just outside Cambridge. Offering PADI scuba diving courses for all levels from beginner to instructor, UK dive trips all year round plus many foreign dive trips. We offer full equipment servicing and compressed air or nitrox fills delivered right to your door as well as equipment rental and servicing plus discounts.
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Scuba diving training Bedfordshire


Humongous thanks to the most tolerant and supportive instructor I could ever have wished for! Today's dive in the Lake was awesome and I loved every minute! Next dive - Hikkaduwa in Sri Lanka in 3 weeks!!!
Underwater Adventures have blessed me with a whole new world. Please ensure you contact them for all your scuba inquiries! Stephen is an exceptional instructor and the other divemasters involved really have been outstanding throughout my 6 months of training and preparation... it has been a long road but I am over the moon. I am now a PADI open water scuba diver and immensely proud of myself!

Aiden Lunnon, Hertfordshire 5 out of 5 stars
PADI Scuba diving training Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire and Cambridge


Reef safe sun protection for your scuba diving holidays.
We all know that we need to put on some form of protection from the Sun while scuba diving, even here in the UK we run the risk of sunburn while we are out on a boat between dives and although our dry suits and wetsuits protect most of us, our hand and face can be at particular risk of sunburn during a day out scuba diving. So it makes sense to use a sun cream while we are on the dive boat or chilling on shore between dives and I know I always keep some sun cream in the van. But something we are only just starting to think about is what are these chemicals we are putting on our skin to protect ourselves doing to the environment and the delicate ecosystems we enjoy visiting during our scuba diving trips.


I know what you are thinking. It’s only a small bit of cream and the oceans are so vast, but what we must remember is that there are so many of us suing the water know that it soon builds up.

Say you have 15 divers on a boat using sun cream, and then look at a place like Sharm el shak which has around 50 boats heading out a day, that’s 750 people where sun cream going into the water each day just from that one location and doing that one sport. If you expand that to look at it globally and include all other sports like surfing, kayaking, and snorkeling, plus add all the people who just go to the beach for a day’s fun, you have thousands upon thousands of people going into the sea with sun cream on each day, 365 days a year. That’s a lot of sun cream and the chemicals its made up from, being washed into the ocean each day and these levels soon build up.
But what can we do? We can’t go without sun protection!
It’s actually quite simple. We just need to start using reef safe sun creams. The sun creams which protect us but don’t contain harmful chemicals, and let’s face it, putting less harmful chemicals into our own body systems is a good idea anyway.

OK, so what do we need to avoid if possible?

The big one is Oxybenzone, which has been shown to increase coral bleaching, (click here for an interesting video on its effect ) but we also need to look out for Titanium dioxide and zinc dioxide Nanoparticle which, when introduced into the ocean can change into hydrogen peroxide, you know, that stuff you use to bleach your hair blond. At least we used to but now we use a chemical that isn’t so damaging to our hair and if hydrogen peroxide does that to our hair, just imagine what it's doing to the reef life. I must be clear here, with these we are looking at the Nanoparticle titanium dioxide and zinc dioxide which you will find in clear sprays, uncoated titanium dioxide and zinc dioxide which is safe for reefs as it doesn’t change into hydrogen peroxide in the water, just because life’s not confusing enough anyway.
We should also avoid Octinoxate, Butylparaben, 4-Methylbenzylidene Camphor. A recent study shows that these chemicals which are commonly found in sun creams do cause significate damage to reef systems (click here for a link to the paper)
Unfortunately, those chemicals do seem to be in most of today’s sun creams but there is a populist movement away from these chemicals and towards reef safe sun creams with place like Hawaii looking at banning sun creams which aren’t reef safe altogether and you can do your part too just by making sure you buy reef safe sun creams and encouraging others to do the same. If we stop buying the stuff that’s damaging the environment we love to visit while scuba diving, the companies will stop making it, people power at its best ????
Here are some links to help you find reef safe sun creams ready for your next holiday

Badger Sunscreen SPF 30         

Lovera Natural sunscreen SPF 30           

Jasons Natural sunbrella sunscreen SPF 20      

Bio Solis Melt-on Sun Cream - SPF 30 (100ml)       

Although we want to protect the reefs and all the fishes we also want to look after ourselves, so if you do spend a lot of time outside like us scuba divers do and you find something you are not sure about on your skin, please don't just shrug it off, follow this link for some more information from the NHS.
                                                                                    Click here 
An early season scuba diving trip to Stoney Cove

As a suitable antidote to the club trip to Lanzarote at the end of February beginning of March, Steve Groves and myself thought a bracing scuba diving trip to Stoney Cove near Leicester would be in order, for some strange reason there were no other takers in the dive club, then we realised that we had chosen "Mothering Sunday" so assumed that all the other club members were being dutiful children and the icy water was not a factor.
 I don't know, the youngsters today (Gratuitous old G*T comment)
We arrived at 7:10 after a misty journey up and virtually drove straight in with plenty of parking available, and cheery staff to welcome us in. With reported visibility of 4-6 meters and 5 degrees water temperature, Steve and I were happy that we could show the dive club flag amongst the training scuba schools in wetsuits, free divers in swimming costumes with their rubber ducks, and the weighed down tec divers. We were wanting to practice our dry suit skills, in particular with many layers of insulation, this proved to be a suitable challenge for the day.

Using the wonderfully heated changing rooms we were ready to scuba dive before the schools had finished their briefing, however, a false start dealing with the effect of the low temperature on regulators, even low temp rated ones, meant that we had to fine tune our buoyancy skills in pretty murky water. Keeping a constant depth with no datum other than your buddy and a dive computer was an educational experience but one we had experienced before and we descended down to 18 m, our computers registered 4.7 C. Steve reckoned he saw the Viscount cockpit but I was a bit preoccupied as I found a combination of balancing squeeze with depth and the detrimental effect of the squeeze on my insulation added another variable by needing more air in the suit than on previous scuba dives, but then that was why we were there! Eventually, the Bacon Cobs beckoned, and we enthusiastically ended the dive.

Having achieved our objective, it was felt the second scuba dive would be a shallow one with some exploration for both of us, we chose to go round the quarry in a clockwise direction going no deeper than 8 m. Our first encounter was the Nautilus submarine where we had to wait at imaginary traffic lights to lets dozens of youngers in wetsuits pass by, the trip had to include a visit to the monster, I had to hold Steve's hand as he was terrified. Visibility did improve as we moved away from the student activity areas, the highlight of the scuba dive came for me as we reached the "Gresham" a genuine Elizabethan wreck. This wreck is being held at Stony Cove for preservation purposes and is fascinating for anyone who has visited the Mary Rose exhibition in Portsmouth Dockyard. This scuba dive lasted 36 minutes and I left the water with over 100Bar in my tank, a real achievement for me and combined with my 50th dive made for a memorable day for me.

In conclusion, an enjoyable day for both Steve and I, the challenge being, in part, the weather and temperature but all the more satisfying because of that, we learnt and experienced new things not least the" third scuba dive" which was in "Nemo’s Bar" where the fire was burning, and good food and drink was experienced. Well, we needed somewhere to update our logbooks!

Why should you choose to do your PADI open water course with underwater adventures?

The PADI open water course is the world most widely used and recognized entry-level course in the world, you have even probably heard people talking about “getting their PADI” in relation to learning to scuba dive, well this is the course they are talking about. PADI is one of the largest teaching organizations in the world, teaching thousands of scuba divers year with the latest teaching techniques and teaching philosophies and innovations, leading the way in how people learn to scuba dive for over 50 years.


The PADI open water course is designed to get you in the water and learn through experience as soon as possible with the first pool session available as a “Discover Scuba Diving” try dive before you’ve even signed up to the full course do that you can see if you enjoy it before signing up to the full PADI open water course for only £45 per person and if you sign up to the PADI open water course once you have completed your Discover Scuba Diving session, the cost of the session is deducted from the cost of the full course.


The full PADI open water course is made up of three sections, the dive theory part where you learn the how’s and why's of scuba diving giving you an understanding of how scuba diving works. The confined water section where you will become familiar with the equipment and learn the skills you need to become a confidence scuba diver and the four open water dives where you will experience the thrills and excitement of scuba diving while under the guidance of our highly trained and experienced dive team.


The main difference between underwater adventures and most other scuba diving schools is that we focus on the Students learning experience, which is why our dive theory can either be completed online at your own pace or in a one to one session with one of our instructors and it is also why we offer unlimited sessions in any of our swimming pools located in Cambridge, Bedfordshire, and Hertfordshire. This allows you to learn to scuba dive at your own pace. If you want to can learn to scuba dive in a couple of weeks or a few months. We want you to have the best learning experience as possible, so you will never be pushed to learn quicker then you feel comfortable. It is important for us for you to learn to scuba dive at your own pace. Even with our open water dives, which take place at a specialist scuba diving lake just south of Peterborough, are completed with a maximum group size of four students and at least two PADI professionals on each dive.


Because we fit the PADI open water course around your needs and requirements and because we are as flexible as possible, you can start and finish your PADI open water course whenever you like and take as long as you like to finish. It is all about you and your learning experience.
So why should you learn to scuba dive with us? Because we will endeavor to give you the best scuba diving education as possible while allowing you to learn to scuba dive at your own pace in a fun and friendly environment.

If you would like to book your PADI open water course or would like more information about the PADI open water course, the Dive club, or any of the other PADI course we run? Please contact us by clicking here.